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20120901
20120930
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WMPT (PBS) 23
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Sep 12, 2012 5:30pm EDT
the attack on the consulate in libya -- condemns the attack on the consulate in libya. >> how could this happen in a country we helped liberate and the city we helped saved from destruction. >> killed for being gay. authorities in iraq are behind the systematic persecution of homosexuals, and capturing the world in color a century after movies broke out in black and white, the first films are being discovered. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. no american ambassador has been killed in the line of duty since 1979, but today the flags have been put at half mast in honor of chris stevens. the u.s. ambassador and three other diplomats were killed in the raid. the white house is investigating whether the attacks were planned, and president obama has promised to bring the killers to justice. >> in the darkness and confusion, witnesses said the area was cordoned off by heavily armed men. the attack was linked with an american film the attackers then insulting the prophet mohammed. >> we have to stop this. stopping the film is our hope. >> by the morning the u.s
PBS
Sep 19, 2012 5:30pm EDT
. in libya, the ambassador was killed. in 20 countries, they have stepped up security. in cairo, the embassy was surrounded by police. schools have been protected. want these people to think that we're infringing their right to free expression. the government has urged the muslim community to register their anger to the courts. one group has registered a complaint. the head of the muslim council called for calm. >> we expressed to him the fury at these provocations but we talk about our peaceful intentions. >> france has the biggest muslim community in europe. the tensions are high. after protests last week, the government has refused a request for a bigger demonstration on saturday. the foreign minister says it is about france's problem. >> tensions have not eased across the middle east a week after the american ambassador to libya was killed in benghazi. and all to conservative muslim group denied any involvement in the assault but said it rejected what it's all as the imposition of democracy in libya. -- what it saw as the imposition of democracy in libya. >> libya celebrating martyrs' da
PBS
Sep 12, 2012 6:00pm EDT
the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya that killed four americans, including the ambassador. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we get the latest on the deadly assault, believed to have been planned in advance and sparked by an anti-muslim internet video. >> woodruff: plus, we examine the move by governor romney to criticize the president's handling of the libya tinderbox. was it justified or not? we hear from both sides. >> ifill: then, jeffrey brown looks at how the latest iphone upgrade is accelerating competition in the smartphone industry. >> woodruff: are chemicals sprayed in oregon's forests dangerous or not? we have a report from our partners at the center for investigative reporting. >> they're spraying with helicopters all these ridged tops, so everything they're spraying up top eventually gets down to all of these residents. >> forced application of herbicides is done in accordance with all state laws. and we believe it does not represent an unreasonable harm. >> ifill: and margaret warner gets a snapshot of poverty in americ
PBS
Sep 15, 2012 5:00am EDT
in libya, we went to a newly liberated town, famous or notorious for sending an unusually high number of young muslims and to fight american forces in iraq. some former soldiers return to their own country last year, joining revolutionary militias, and keeping their weapons even after gaddafi was overthrown. s he says he knows the group' influenced but -- influenced by al-qaeda were behind the attack on the u.s. consulate. >> it is first hand information. it is direct information. they believe libya cannot be a hub for the conflict. but it should be used or utilize as a backyard for a logistic space for a bigger fatah, which is egypt or syria or maybe both of them. >> the americans cannot reverse the arabs bring. the question as how to respond to the dangers? -- the americans cannot reverse the arab spring? should it avoid treading too heavily in the region for fear of exacerbating the issue? or has it become, as some republicans feel, too indecisive and apologetic? america needs to make it clear what it stands for. >> what the united states needs to do is take the kind of leadership
PBS
Sep 27, 2012 6:00pm EDT
. >> brown: then, was the attack on the u.s. mission in libya the work of al qaeda? we take a look. >> woodruff: from our american graduate series, ray suarez reports on growing pains for north dakota schools brought on by the oil boom. >> i always make it very clear to any perspective teachers of what they are really getting themselves into. i tell them this is the new wild west. >> brown: on the "daily download," we examine how the candidates are using video games to push early voting. >> woodruff: and regular pro referees are back on the football field tonight after three weeks of questionable calls by replacements. we talk to npr's mike pesca about the deal struck with the nfl. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. an
PBS
Sep 13, 2012 5:30pm EDT
and also around the globe. u.s. warships are sailing to the coast of libya following the coast -- the death of the american ambassador. american embassies around the world are ramping up security. in yemen, those measures might be too late. protesters in the yemeni capital reached the embassy walls today. it is continuing fallout of a film produced in america that muslims see as an insult to the prophet muhammed. from the libyan capital, tripoli, are middle east editor now reports. >> the american embassy in, yemen's capital -- in sanaa, mn's capital, is heavily fortified. the anger spreading across the region about the anti-muslim film is deepened by the belief that somehow that america and its western friends would do damage to islam however they can. in cairo, violence continued around the american embassy. he is saying, "the film is not the first instance. there have been so many. there should be an international law to stop insults to islam." all this is a reminder that religion and politics are often the same thing in the middle east, and another sign that overthrowing dictator is tha
PBS
Sep 13, 2012 6:00pm EDT
consulate in libya was attacked. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have new details about the killing of the u.s. ambassador in bengazi and the film that fueled the anger there and elsewhere. >> brown: plus, we get perspective on the middle east nearly two years after the arab spring uprisings. is it now a more dangerous place? >> woodruff: then, as the federal reserve unleashes a new program to encourage job creation, we assess the potential impact on consumers and the u.s. economy. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro reports on a helping hand for low-income american entrepreneurs, inspired by loans offered in the developing world. >> i used it to purchase about 30 handmade senegalese drums. >> we used the money to fix the store. >> we used the microgrant dollars for, at the time, was to... more signage. >> woodruff: and on the daily download, margaret warner examines how the presidential campaigns are using social media to amplify their messages. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newsh
PBS
Sep 14, 2012 8:30pm EDT
. it is hard for the american people to make sense of that because it is senseless. the people of egypt, libya, yemen, and tunisia did not trade the tyranny of a dictator for the tyranny of a mob. gwen: but the protests have spread as this google map shows. throughout the middle east and beyond. you can look and see -- it's pakistan, in london, it's everywhere all over the region and beyond. what happened in benghazi was tragic, but is this something that had been building for some time, david? or was this just the spark? >> gwen, i think it was the flip side of these revolutions that we all watched with sauch maysment and such enthusiasm in some cases in january and february of last year. you know, at the time of those uprising, president obama said what was remarkable about the arab spring was that it wasn't about us, it was about them. it was about throwing avenue old dictators. well, whenever you traveled through the region there wasals -- always -- was always still a little bit of an undercurrent of about us, whether we were supporting democracy or imposing our values. this week it really
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. last year, france played a key role rein libya. i am please to have laurent fabius back at this table. welcome back. >> it is the same table, although a different venue. looking at libya and looking at syria, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we hav
PBS
Sep 5, 2012 5:30pm EDT
. the army chief of staff sent the prisoner was confident he would have a fair trial. libya can still be chaotic. in the violence before just a year ago, he slipped away. , nowd the colonel's son also in custody, awaiting trial. in 2009, states welcomed by the convicted lockerbie bomber when he was in a scottish jail. he is believed to be one of the masterminds behind the attack. gaddafi went from a pariah to the new and useful ally after a deal to come in from the cold. the intelligence chief was the key figure in the security cooperation that followed a. >> he would know a huge amount of what was going on. they have report coming out tomorrow. the involvement of the u.s. and also the u.k., sending them back to libya where many were tortured. that information needs to come around. >> he was one of gaddafi's closest associates. he also presumably knows a lot about dealings with the intelligence service in london and washington. some of that information could be politically embarrassing to western countries the have been close to colonel gaddafi. he is also wanted for a massacre in 199
PBS
Sep 11, 2012 5:30pm EDT
in liberty -- in libya have stormed ben ghazi, that country's second-largest city. reports say that they were protecting an american film that allegedly humiliates the prophet muhammed. protesters in egypt during the american flag outside the u.s. embassy in cairo. they, too, were protesting the fell. they say it abuses the right of free speech and hurts the religious beliefs of others. today in the united states and many places around the world, people stopped to mark the of the 11th anniversary of the september 11 attacks in which nearly 3000 were killed. the president led a moment of silence this morning and then traveled to the pentagon for a ceremony there. in new york, people gathered at the memorial's where twin towers once stood. more than a decade later, where does the greatest threat remained? i spoke with a senior fellow at the center for american progress. before i get to where we are 11 years on, here we are at the council of in ben ghazi in libya, a country that americans helped to liberate from colonel gaddafi, being stormed. it is an indication, is in it, of how strong muslim
PBS
Sep 14, 2012 5:30pm EDT
it how can the ambassador to libya be killed when it america helped overthrow colonel gaddafi? >> in many ways, this is the most tragic country. the u.s. and nato went in and used military muscle to do what the libyan troops on the ground could not do, and that was to take away the strategic assets of gaddafi. to return as ambassador -- he worked on the ground in libya. he of all people would have been surprised by what happened. >> the german embassy was attacked. they had absolutely nothing to do with the islamic film which was made in the u.s. do you think this is more of a generalized anti-western sentiment? >> is the debate of more than 30 years now. is it the west and islam incompatible? i do not think so, but there are those who will look for not just american targets, but any western shuttle endeavour. >> just briefly, do you see these protests continuing or fizzling out after friday prayers? >> i expect they will continue in some form in some places. >> thank you for joining us with that analysis and what is going on in the arab world right now. in other news, striking south afri
PBS
Sep 14, 2012 6:00pm EDT
in libya. >> woodruff: then, did the big bank bailouts here in the u.s. work? ray suarez gets two views on this fourth anniversary of the fall of lehman brothers. >> brown: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and hari sreenivasan talks with journalist sasha issenberg about his new book exploring how the campaigns are mining data to boost turnout in november. >> whether you are likely to default on your loan or pay off your bill on time or run up $500 on your credit card in a given month, on trying to predict who you are going vote in november, who are you likely to vote for, what issues do you care about. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and from carnegie foundation >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: protesters poured into streets around the world today, outraged by a fi
PBS
Sep 25, 2012 11:00pm EDT
to remove milosivich. >> rose: qaddafi in libya. >> then of course people should understand this would be slightly difference from saving lives immediately. >> rose: all the example you just showed, do you think they are bad precedents, whether it was milosovich or sadaam husain. were they somebody russia disagreed with on each count. >> we disagreed with any use of force which was not authorized by the security council. >> rose: it is said that your government and you are, were very much upset by what happened in libya in terms of the united kingdom, with the security council authorized and what the french government did, that that somehow offended you, that that colors your impression of what you're prepared to do in syria. >> that's not the right word -- >> rose: choose the right word. >> -- to describe it. no one likes when people cheat. when it relates to international issues of huge importance involving hundreds and thousands of human lives the cheating is heavier price. >> rose: what's the cheating. >> the cheating was on the no fly zone. the no fly zone, this notion when it
PBS
Sep 20, 2012 5:30pm EDT
, libya, india, mobs coming out. these societies alike pressure cookers. there is a lot of pressure within this society. a perceived attack on the pro phet is kind of like a catalyst. this touches very deeply into society. a gesture like the one made by the secretary of state, hillary clinton, is something very positive. but, we need to understand that unless the paradigm changes, we will have cause and effect and i don't condone any violence of any kind. we had 100 deaths since the crisis of the danish cartoons. we have had about 30 deaths since the film came out and the ambassador was killed. how many more deaths before we realize there is a direct connection between one thing and the other? when you set out to provoke people, it is no longer free speech. >> tell me what it is specifically about the prophet that muslims find so offensive. >> many people in the west would look to this and say that we lampooned everyone. why not your prophet? he is the foundation of the faith. on a cultural and social level, there is immense respect and affection for him. love on his birthday. ceremonies o
PBS
Sep 21, 2012 6:00pm EDT
of these countries, particularly it started in the countries where revolutions took place and libya, and tunesia, and yemen. there is a contestation for control, governments are still week. and so because islam is so... is still pervasive as a religion, and in fact islamic society tend to be the most religious in the world, it is easy for groups with political intent to rally the public behind them particularly extremists. >> brown: let me bring in lawrence pintak, how do you... that is a lot on the table, free speech, religion, power struggles that go back in time. what do you see when you look at events today and over the last week or so? >> there's all those things going on. but at the bottom line it is agit prop designed to provoke the hard line in the middle east and beyond that success fey does that because it's an excuse for them. in egypt we have cops who are trying to undermine-- and across the broader muslim world you have hard-liners seizing on this for their own goals. >> brown: an larry pintak just so stay with you, it is clearly the interconnectedness of the world makes this much e
PBS
Sep 26, 2012 6:00pm EDT
and arab-led as it did-- as happened in libya? >> of course in libya there was a u.n. resolution which created the base for this coalition of willing. but if the u.n. cannot do anything, all the other options and measures should be on the table. and those countries will have concerns and common interests. they should study all these options. >> warner: turkey would take part? >> you are you are the ski alrey taking part. >> warner: no, i mean a military sense. >> of course. not only on this, but turkey will be in all processes related to syria. >> warner: if there is an action taken on syria and the conflict continues to grind on what danger do you see of it sparking, really, a wider sunni/shi'a war in the region? >> there is such a risk not only in syria but in the region. why? because this inability of u.n. resulted in 300,000 casualties and 100,000 rape cases in bosnia for three years. the u.n. was idle for three years. i talked to his excellency, secretary-general ban ki-moon yesterday and he went and apologized because of the inability of united nations in the 1990s. i am afraid t
PBS
Sep 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
as a soil scientist in libya and saudi arabia. we talked about family, religion, business, energy, war and peace and the future of america. i'll it will you this: mitt is a good man, a good family man and a local american. [ applause ] but -- [ laughter ] -- and you knew there was a but -- he brought the wrong agenda to massachusetts and he is the wrong guy to be president of united states. [cheers and applause] now governor mitt romney saddled massachusetts taxpayers with an additional $2.6 billion in debt and left them with the most debt per capita of any state in america. in montana, that dog don't hunt. remember those words, i might ask you to say them. governor mitt romney cut higher education by 14% in his first year which meant that college education sky rocketed for students in massachusetts. now i guess that's okay if you can afford it. but for the rest of us, that dog don't hunt. now governor mitt romney raised taxes and fees by $750 million a year. now i'm going to let you in on a little secret, when a politician doesn't want to be honest about a tax hike, he calls it a fee
PBS
Sep 17, 2012 6:00pm EDT
furor no christians? >> there are no more christians in algeria, in tunisia, in libya. where there was a majority of christians 700, 800 years ago. they're gone. there's no one. so it is not difficult to imagine that in the rest of the region that will also happen as more christians are immigrating. they're leaching. they're going to australia. they're going to the states. they're going to europe. >> suarez: meaning the current instability carries the risk of not just further shrinking christianity in the religion's birth place but bringing its disappearance that much closer. >> woodruff: you can see a slide show of images from the pope's visit to lebanon on our website. find that on the rundown. >> ifill: again, the major developments of the day. the fury over a film that attacks the prophet mohammed spilled into more of the muslim world, including afghanistan, even as the middle east calmed. and president obama announced a new trade action against chinese imports, while mitt romney made a fresh appeal for hispanic support. it's constitution day, and we're celebrating online
PBS
Sep 20, 2012 6:00pm EDT
will investigate the attack in libya that killed u.s. ambassador christopher stevens. he died on september eleventh, when gunmen assaulted the american consulate in benghazi. three other americans also were killed in the attack. the assault came during protests against an anti-islamic film made in the u.s. the u.s. embassy in pakistan put out ads today, condemning that same film. the ads ran on pakistani television and featured clips of president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton condemning the film. still, hundreds of demonstrators tried to reach the embassy in islamabad, by pushing aside huge shipping containers that cordoned off the area. riot police fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. a report on a bungled operation against gun-trafficking in arizona drew praise today from house republicans. they've been investigating "operation fast and furious" for months. at a hearing, the justice department's inspector general michael horowitz listed a string of mistakes by federal law enforcement officials trying to track illegal guns. hundreds of the weapons ended up with mexican drug gangs.
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)